Johan Ericsson | Hamad Bin Khalifa University
Hamad Bin Khalifa University

FACULTY BIOGRAPHIES

Johan Ericsson

Johan Ericsson (PhD)


Associate Professor
College of Health and Life Sciences

  • Phone55 341 809
  • Office locationLAS Building, Room B138

Biography

Dr. Ericsson attended both Uppsala and Stockholm University and obtained his PhD from Stockholm University in 1992. He then moved to the University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA), where he worked on the transcriptional regulation of cholesterol metabolism. 

Dr. Ericsson established his own independent research group in 1998 at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, focusing on the post-translational regulation of a family of transcription factors critical for cholesterol and lipid metabolism, i.e. the SREBP family of proteins. In 2009, Dr. Ericsson became an SFI Stokes Professor at University College Dublin, where his group continued their work on the transcriptional and post-translational regulation of lipid metabolism. Dr. Ericsson has been an Associate Professor at HBKU since May 2019.

 


Research Interests

My group works on the SREBP family of transcription factors. These transcription factors control cholesterol and lipid metabolism and play critical roles during adipocyte differentiation and insulin-dependent gene expression. Disturbances in lipid metabolism are at the very core of several major health issues facing modern society, including cardiovascular disease, obesity, and diabetes. Thus, the factors and signals that regulate the function of the SREBP family of proteins are very relevant to metabolic disease. In fact, the cholesterol-lowering action of the statin family of drugs is dependent on SREBP function. Taken together, the statins is a multi-billion business for the pharmaceutical industry. In addition, SREBP-dependent lipid synthesis contributes to the development of insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes, a major health issue in Qatar. We recently completed several large-scale molecular screens to identify novel regulators of the SREBP pathway. The long-term goal of this work is to establish if any of these regulators could represent novel therapeutic targets in diabetes and/or metabolic disease. A more immediate goal is to establish physiologically relevant human cell systems based on pluripotent stem cells to further study the link between disturbances in lipid metabolism and the development of diabetes and metabolic disease. More generally, these types of model systems may provide an important complement to animal and human/patient studies, and may become especially important for drug development. We are very interested in setting up collaborations with academic/industry partners working with stem-cell-derived cells relevant to metabolic/cardiovascular disease. We are also exploring 3D/spheroid cell culture techniques in order to more accurately model the in vivo environment. More generally, these in vitro systems could become very important during drug development.
 

Experience

Associate Professor

Hamad Bin Khalifa University, College of Medical and Life Sciences.

2019
  • SFI Stokes Professor

    UCD Conway Institute, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin.

    2009 - 2019
  • Associate Member & Group Leader

    Gene Expression Laboratory, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Uppsala, Sweden.

    2004 - 2008
  • Research Fellow

    Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.

    2002 - 2007
  • Assistant Member & Group Leader

    Gene Expression Laboratory, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Uppsala, Sweden.

    1998 - 2003
  • Assistant Research Professor

    Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, USA.

    1997 - 1998
  • Assistant Research Cardiologist

    Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, USA.

    1995 - 1997
  • Postdoctoral Fellow

    Departments of Biological Chemistry and Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, USA.

    1993 - 1995

Education

Postdoctoral Fellow

Departments of Biological Chemistry and Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, USA.

1993 - 1995
  • PhD

    Stockholm University, Department of Biochemistry.

    1992

Selected Publications

  • Bengoechea-Alonso, MT. and Ericsson, J.

    The phosphorylation-dependent regulation of nuclear SREBP1 during mitosis links lipid metabolism and cell growth. Cell Cycle. 15: 2753-2765.

    2016
  • Welcker M., Larimore E.A., Swanger J., Bengoechea-Alonso M.T., Grim J.E., Ericsson J., Zheng N., and Clurman B.E.

    Fbw7 dimerization determines the specificity and robustness of substrate degradation. Genes Dev. 27: 2531-2536.

    2013
  • Bengoechea-Alonso, MT. and Ericsson, J.

    The ubiquitin ligase Fbxw7 controls adipocyte differentiation by targeting C/EBPalpha for degradation. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 11817-22.

    2010
  • Bengoechea-Alonso, MT. and Ericsson, J.

    The tumor suppressor Fbxw7 regulates TGFβ signaling by targeting TGIF1 for degradation. Oncogene 29, 5322-8.

    2010
  • Bengoechea-Alonso MT. and Ericsson, J.

    A phosphorylation cascade controls the degradation of active SREBP1. (2009) J. Biol. Chem. 284, 5885-5895.

    2009
  • Bengoechea, MT., Punga T. and Ericsson, J.

    Hyperphosphorylation regulates the activity of SREBP1 during mitosis. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 102, 11681–11686.

    2005
  • Sundqvist, A., Bengoechea, MT., Ye, X., Lukiyanchuk, V., Jin, J., Harper, JW., and Ericsson, J.

    Control of lipid metabolism by phosphorylation-dependent degradation of the SREBP family of transcription factors by SCFFbw7. Cell Metabolism 1, 379-391.

    2005